Return Engagement at the UU Fellowship

In order not to seem a spiritual quadriplegic to strangers trying to get a fix on me, I sometimes say I’m a Unitarian Universalist. So that denomination claims me as one of their own.
– Kurt Vonnegut

Last Sunday I had the great good privilege to return to the local Unitarian Universalist church as their guest speaker. Oh, but I love that little congregation!

My husband and I brought my mom and dad with us this time – they just moved near us a few weeks ago and I wanted them to meet their new neighbors at the Skagit Unitarian Universalist Fellowship – I knew they’d be made to feel welcome and at home. And sure enough! – as soon as we entered the doors to the hall we were met by friendly hand-shaking people and surrounded by cheery laughter and smiles. In fact, one of the members was the widow of one of Dad’s old mountaineering friends and they immediately got in conversation about old times and mutual friends.

This was no hushed, sanctimonious, dignified fellowship. There was no one standing at the doors trying to usher people to seats, or bid them be quiet. There was no one trying to maintain any kind of decorum. Everywhere was laughter and old friends greeting each other, and new friends meeting for the first time, and love expressed. Everywhere was joy.

About ten minutes after the service was supposed to begin, the celebrant finally saw an opportunity to close the doors to the room and chime the service into being.  Songs were sung, announcements were made, there was the sharing of griefs and joys – and laughter throughout. Attending a Skagit Unitarian Universalist Fellowship service is like being at a comedy club. I always feel at home there.

By the time it was my turn to speak, any nervousness I might have felt had disappeared in the laughter.

“The Healing Power of Love” was the subject of my talk. I talked a bit about my upbringing – raised by a non-religious father and a  Christian Science mother – and how my parents had raised me to be a really happy skeptic: My dad taught me to question political and religious dogma; my mom taught me to question everything I saw, heard, and felt with the material senses. “My parents might not have shared the same religious beliefs, but they shared the same values,” I observed, “and they taught my brothers and me to keep an open mind, to not be hasty to judge others, to appreciate the beauty of nature, and to look for the good in people.” My UU friends nodded their heads at this – open mindedness and looking for the good in others is probably one of the cornerstones of the Unitarian Universalist church. Now and then I would bring my mom (who was sitting in the front row with my dad) into my talk – at those times I felt like George Burns feeding lines to Gracie Allen. Mom should do stand-up comedy.

I explained that I don’t speak for any other Christian Scientists when I speak about Christian Science – I’m only speaking for myself and my own experiences with this way of life.

I talked about how “God” is defined in the Christian Science church and gave the seven synonyms the discoverer of Christian Science, Mary Baker Eddy, gives for God: Principle, Mind, Soul, Spirit, Life, Truth, and Love. Lately I’ve been practicing substituting the word “Love” for “God” in my favorite Bible verses, and I shared some of those verses with the UU congregation: “Fear not, for Love is with thee… Be still, and know that God is Love… All things work together for good to those who love…” and here the congregation filled in the blank with me, “Love.”

I’ve come to a place in my life, I told the congregants, that if something doesn’t come from love or lead to love, I don’t want to waste my time with it. And they nodded their heads in agreement. I love these people. 🙂

Then I shared a healing I had experienced by drawing my thoughts close to Love: When I was in labor with my second son I was told I would need to be given a cesarean – my son was in distress. As I was being wheeled down to the Operating Room I asked my mom to call a Christian Science practitioner for prayerful support. When I got to the OR they hooked me up to a machine to monitor the baby. I prayed – and in Christian Science prayer doesn’t mean to plead with some anthropomorphic god to come down from the clouds and help us – praying, for me, just means to draw my thoughts close to the presence and power of Love. I could feel the love from the doctors and nurses – I knew they wanted to help my baby and me. I knew that everything was unfolding as it should – under the direction of Mind. I found a place of peace. And suddenly the medical staff was looking at the monitor, looking at me, looking back at the monitor – and then they were all yelling, “Push! Push!” and my baby was born the old-fashioned way. One of the nurses was crying – she said she’d never been able to witness a vaginal birth before, and it was so beautiful. When I asked the midwife what had happened to allow my baby to be born naturally, she said, “We don’t know.” And when I asked my mom what the practitioner had told her when she called her, Mom said the practitioner had said, “Life loves that baby!”

It tells you something about the UU congregants that I felt completely comfortable sharing that healing with them. I knew they would understand the feeling of love that lay behind it. (After the service one of the congregants whose father is in the hospital thanked me and told me how helpful my thoughts had been to her – that meant so much to me.)

Maybe the thing I enjoy most about the Skagit Unitarian Universalist Fellowship is that they let me have fun with them. They know how to laugh. They are natural Humoristians.

And they know how to love.

Beloved, let us love one another: for love is of God; and every one that loveth is born of God, and knoweth God… If we love one another; God dwelleth in us, and his love is perfected in us… God is love; and he that dwelleth in love dwelleth in God, and God in him.
– I John 4

“God is Love.” More than this we cannot ask, higher we cannot look, farther we cannot go.
– Mary Baker Eddy

 

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Skagit Unitarian Universalist Fellowship Quilt Panels

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8 thoughts on “Return Engagement at the UU Fellowship

  1. Love the UUC’s in my town of Santa Rosa, CA. Dear friends belong and we go with them on Christmas Eve for their candle lighting, Christmas song celebration. The pastor is a Buddist and every Saturday this congregation of God’s dear ones feed 200 homeless neighbors a marvelous breakfast. Truly “doing the Lord’s work”! Loved this story and your testimony! Blessings 🙂

  2. Four of my five grandchildren were delivered by C section surgeries and one had to be in the NICU for a week. All remain happy, healthy children. Based on the way your worded your testimony, do you suppose that these babies were not held in the “Life that loves that baby”? Would a surgery have resulted in that feeling for you? The tone of your testimony is that somehow you and the baby were “spared” something awful. You say that you don’t think your prayer was to have God come down to you, yet you leave the impression that somehow you had a more “Godlike” experience than the alternative. God would have been with you, the baby and the medical staff, who were also probably praying.

    • Hi, Diane! Oh gosh! I can totally see how you might have gotten the impression that I thought my experience was somehow more “Godlike” – but I left out this part (and maybe I shouldn’t have) – when I was speaking to my UU friends I told them that I came to the realization that it didn’t matter how this unfolded – whether I had a cesarean or not – I realized it would be alright either way. I have to admit I’m grateful that I didn’t have to have a cesarean – I’d prefer not to be cut open – but even if I’d had a cesarean then, the important thing, for me, during that experience was the love I felt in that room.

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