Conversation about Christian Science on a Discussion Board

What prayer feels like, for me, is… it’s like waking up to a beautiful sunrise in the morning or listening to an inspiring piece of music, or looking at the stars on a clear night – it’s a feeling of uplift – of thoughts soaring, of fear dissipating, of a consciousness full of joy and good will. Often times my prayers come with humor – laughing always seems to help get rid of fear for me – and for me, fear is always a part of whatever problem I’m facing. And Love is always a part of the healing. I’ve sometimes known I was healed before I saw the healing manifested humanly – I could feel the change in my thoughts. 
– Karen Molenaar Terrell 

Every now and then something really amazing happens – people with different perspectives on life will get beyond biases, prejudices, and stereotypes and have a real conversation with each other! I love when that happens…

Here are excerpts from a recent conversation about Christian Science on an Amazon Discussion Forum:

Mustaaaaard says:
Yeah. Christian Science. The people who let their children die because they don’t believe in Tylenol. Eff off.

Karen says:
I was raised by a CS mom (now 87) and a non-religious dad (will be 97 in a month), and I could not have asked for better parents. My parents maybe didn’t share the same religious beliefs, but they shared the same values and taught their children to take care of the environment, to appreciate the beauty of nature, to look for the good in people, to play fair, to not be quick to judge others, to not buy into every piece of hearsay, rumor, and gossip that comes our way, but to do our own research, and question our own beliefs and biases, and recognize the biases of others, too. I’m really grateful they are still in my life.

The Weasel asks:

Karen, can the core beliefs of CS be boiled down to a few bullet points? Can you try to list them as far as you understand them to be please?

Karen says:
Hi Weasel,
It’s probably important to note that I am not an official spokesperson for the CS church or anything – and I do not speak for any other CSists – just for myself. CSists come in all shapes and sizes and colors and political parties and most professions (I even knew a CSist who was a dentist 🙂 ). There’s no one in our church leadership telling us how to vote or who to vote for or where to stand on social-political issues – that is left up to individual conscience. Some CSists are religious. Some are not. I am not. In my mind I make a distinction between the religion of Christian Science, and Christian Science as a way of living, and a way of looking at the world. 

It might actually be easier to start with what CSists don’t believe:
– CSists don’t believe in an anthropomorphic god
– CSists don’t believe the world was literally created in a week
– CSists don’t believe in literal places of hell and heaven
– CSists don’t believe in pleading, cajoling, and begging a capricious supernatural god who might choose to heal, or might choose to not heal his children
– CSists don’t believe in Original Sin, or that God’s children are sinners.

What CSists believe:
– Mary Baker Eddy, the discover of CS, offers these synonyms for God: Principle, Mind, Soul, Spirit, Life, Truth, and Love.
– CSists believe that Jesus’ mission here was to show us how to heal. In the CS textbook, Eddy writes: “Atonement is the exemplification of man’s unity with God, whereby man reflects divine Truth, Life, and Love. Jesus of Nazareth taught and demonstrated man’s oneness with the Father, and for this we owe him  endless homage. His mission was both individual and collective. He did life’s work aright not only in justice to himself, but in mercy to mortals,- to show them how to do theirs, but not to do it for them nor to relieve them of a single responsibility.”

What *I* have experienced: – I have found that when I’m able to draw my thoughts close to Love – to fill my thoughts up with joy, hope, and love (and eliminate fear, hate, and anger) – I experience healing in my life. I don’t have to plead with Love to heal me – it’s the nature of Love to heal. I don’t consider these healings “miracles” – I consider them natural. I apologize. I realize this was kind of long. I couldn’t figure out how to explain an entire way of life in a pithy post. Hope this helps you understand how at least ONE Christian Scientist looks at the world. And thanks for asking! 🙂
Karen  

Lifelong Atheist says:
There is no evidence whatsoever that prayer works at all (and no, “I prayed and God healed my little girl” is not evidence). There is plenty of evidence that medical care works, preventable errors notwithstanding. I can personally testify to that. Christian Science parents who deliberately withhold medical care from their children in favor of prayer are potential murderers. If their child then dies, they’re actual murderers. That’s the bottom line for me.

Karen says:
Lifelong,
I suppose there may be CSists who view medical science as The Enemy. I am not one of them. My brother-in-law is an anesthesiologist, my sister-in-law is an emergency room nurse, a niece is a medical doctor, a nephew just graduated from med school – and these are all people I love and respect very much – they are not my enemies – they work very hard to do what they can to help their patients. But they are also all people of integrity and honesty – and I don’t doubt that they’d be the first to tell you that medical science is not perfect – theories about cause and cure are constantly in flux; medications that help one person might kill another; what seems like “good medical practice” today might prove to be the source of woe tomorrow. I’m sure we’ve all had friends and family members for whom the medical treatment that was supposed to cure them actually ended up killing them – I know I have. And I’m pretty sure we’ve all seen those commercials on television that tell us about the side effects of drugs that might include liver problems, depression, vulnerability to infections, diarrhea, nausea, death, etc. – I’m always wondering who is running out to get those medications, you know? I think a healthy skepticism in regards to medical science – as well as Christian Science, faith healing, religious beliefs, mass media, and political propoganda – is a good thing. Blind and unquestioning trust in any form of treatment does not seem very healthy to me.

Have you ever read Norman Cousins’s Anatomy of an Illness As Perceived by the Patient? I would highly recommend it.  Here’s my review for it:

In the beginning of the book, Cousins tells us about the illness from which he was told by medical specialists he wouldn’t be able to recover. He briefly describes how he declined to accept this medical verdict for himself, and with the support of his personal physician, set about putting into action a plan of treatment for himself which included plying himself with high doses of ascorbic acid (vitamin C) and humor (Candid Camera episodes, and Marx Brothers movies).Cousins was able to recover from his illness and later wrote a story about his treatment and recovery for the New England Journal of Medicine.

The remainder of the book shares communication from doctors and medical research that supports Cousins’s belief that medical care is both a science and an art – and that positive human emotions play a big part in recovery from an illness. Cousins talks about the importance of a healthy doctor-patient partnership when treating disease, the part creativity and a “robust will to live” plays in longevity, and the power found in placebos. Cousins writes: “It is doubtful whether the placebo – or any drug, for that matter – would get very far without a patient’s robust will to live… The placebo is only a tangible object made essential in an age that feels uncomfortable with intangibles… The placebo, then, is an emissary between the will to live and the body. But the emissary is expendable.”

Cousins talks about the need so many seem to have to see their doctor DOing something, and giving them something tangible to help them. But Cousins suggests there may come a time when these “tangibles” are no longer needed. 

Near the end of the book, Cousins asks the question: “Is there a conflict at times between the treatment of disease and the treatment of human beings?” What a great question! If a doctor treats his patient as just a lump of flesh to be prodded, injected, weighed, measured, and tested then, I think, a really important part of the healing process is missing. The best doctors, to my way of thinking, are the ones who are able to listen to their patients, reassure them, provide confidence in their healing, and value them as partners in the process. In my life I have encountered several practitioners with these fine qualities. After reading Cousins’s book, and the letters he included from doctors around the country, I am encouraged to believe that there is a growing number of medical physicians ready and willing to treat human beings, rather than just disease.  

Art asks:
“It might actually be easier to start with what CSists don’t believe: – CSists don’t believe in an anthropomorphic god – CSists don’t believe in pleading, cajoling, and begging a capricious supernatural god who might choose to heal, or might choose to not heal his children” OK, final question for now Karen: I always thought that Christian Scientists WERE praying and pleading with a capricious supernatural god to heal illnesses rather than take a family member to a doctor. If not, what is the exact nature of the prayer involved?

Karen replies:
Art, you ask: “I always thought that Christian Scientists WERE praying and pleading with a capricious supernatural god to heal illnesses rather than take a family member to a doctor. If not, what is the exact nature of the prayer involved?”

Thank you for asking this question. Christian Scientists have been lumped in with “faith healers” a couple times on this thread. Faith healers would not appreciate this – I’m pretty sure they consider CS a cult and its members “un-Christian” – and CSists don’t consider themselves faith healers. You wouldn’t hear a CSist ever saying “It’s God’s will” that someone died, or “God wanted that child with Him in heaven.” CSists don’t do the talking in tongues thing, or the laying on of hands thing, or the handling serpents thing. CSists may be crazy, but they are a totally different kind of crazy. 🙂

Mary Baker Eddy’s written a whole chapter on “Prayer” in the CS textbook, Science and Health with Key to the Scriptures. Here are some thoughts about prayer from that chapter: 

“God is not moved by the breath of praise to do more than He has already done, nor can the infinite do less than bestow all good, since He is unchanging wisdom and Love… Prayer cannot change the Science of being, but it tends to bring us into harmony with it… The mere habit of pleading with the divine Mind, as one pleads with a human being, perpetuates the belief in God as humanly circumscribed,- an error which impedes spiritual growth. 

“God is Love. Can we ask Him to be more? God is intelligence. Can we inform the infinite Mind of anything He does not already comprehend? Do we expect to change perfection? Shall we plead for more at the open fount, which is pouring forth more than we accept?… Are we really grateful for the good already received? …The habitual struggle to be always good is unceasing prayer… 

“‘God is Love.’ More than this we cannot ask, higher we cannot look, farther we cannot go… In divine Science, where prayers are mental, all may avail themselves of God as ‘a very present help in trouble.’ Love is impartial and universal in its adaptation and bestowals.”

What prayer feels like, for me, is… it’s like waking up to a beautiful sunrise in the morning or listening to an inspiring piece of music, or looking at the stars on a clear night – it’s a feeling of uplift – of thoughts soaring, of fear dissipating, of a consciousness full of joy and good will. Often times my prayers come with humor – laughing always seems to help get rid of fear for me – and for me, fear is always a part of whatever problem I’m facing. And Love is always a part of the healing. I’ve sometimes known I was healed before I saw the healing manifested humanly – I could feel the change in my thoughts. 

Art asks:
Personal question Karen: you don’t believe as your parents do but you still self-identify as a Christian Scientist?

Karen responds:
My dad is non-religious. My mom is… she is simply wonderful. My mom wasn’t raised in CS – she found Christian Science not long before she married my dad – she was attracted to this way of life because she liked the idea of a God who is Love – a Love that heals. She never had any kind of official position in the church or anything – like me, she is not really a very religious person. She is an independent thinker and a free spirit – not into group-think. 

I identify as a Christian Scientist because I really like the ideas and thoughts found in the CS textbook – I believe in God as Love, and I’ve experienced healing through my understanding of Love.

Art responds:
“I identify as a Christian Scientist because I really like the ideas and thoughts found in the CS textbook – I believe in God as Love, and I’ve experienced healing through my understanding of Love.”
Thanks for the insight Karen. Anyways, like many here I’ve always had a negative opinion of Christian Scientists so I appreciate an intelligent perspective from somebody like yourself.

Karen replies:
Art,
You write: “Anyways, like many here I’ve always had a negative opinion of Christian Scientists so I appreciate an intelligent perspective from somebody like yourself.” Thank you.

And thank you for asking questions with a genuine interest in learning what I had to say. That felt really good. 🙂

Buck “Buck” Buckaw says:
Michael Nesmith is a devout CS (as I’ve mentioned to you on a previous occasion) but you wouldn’t know it by listening to his music. It didn’t come to my notice until I read a biography about him.

Karen responds:
Buck “Buck” Buckaw – 
I do remember our talking about Michael Nesmith – and I remember enjoying that conversation very much. 🙂

Another one of my favorite people – an atheist, not a Christian Scientist – had this to say about Michael Nesmith: “So then, a few years ago, I was introduced to someone who became a great friend of mine, Michael Nesmith, who has done a number of different things in his career: In addition to being a film producer, he was originally one of the Monkees. Which is kind of odd when you get to know him, because he’s such a serious, thoughtful, quiet chap, but with quiet reserves of impish glee… I just hope that there will be other projects in the future that he and I will work on together, because I like him enormously and we got on very well together.” – Douglas Adams (Adams died not long after that and I don’t think he was able to work with Nesmith again – but it really meant something to me that Adams saw those qualities in Nesmith, a CSist.)

And no, you will not hear a CSist knocking at your door. 🙂 Frankly, it took me a long time before I felt comfortable “admitting” I was a CSist or talking about my way of life in an open and honest way. I know there is a lot of… not sure what the word is… misinformation? bias? prejudice?… about CS, and I’m not always eager to enter discussions about CS… sometimes – if I sense that nobody is really interested in having their minds relieved of their prejudices – I choose not to enter those discussions at all. But it felt to me like there were people on this thread who were genuine and sincere in their questions about CS. It is good to hear your voice again, my friend.  Karen

Buck “Buck” Buckaw says:
Thank you so much for your kind words, I always enjoy our exchanges immensely and recall them with fondness.
Regardless of what belief system you might adhere to, you are a shining light. Keep on shining brightly.

Karen says:
Oh, Buck “Buck” Buckaw – thank you. You don’t know what your kind words mean to me tonight. Thank you. I am so glad to know you are in the world.

Buck “Buck” Buckaw says:
OK, that’s enough of the mutual admiration society.
We risk turning the whole thing into some sort of giant hug fest and that just won’t do, particularly for the more jaundiced participants of this thrill ride. Now, what were we talking about? Oh yeah…..Christian Scientists hey? What a kooky bunch.

Karen says:
I know, right? Tell me about it. 🙂

Posts taken from this thread: http://www.amazon.com/forum/religion/ref=cm_cd_pg_pg8?_encoding=UTF8&cdForum=Fx1M9TK6UGAX6EO&cdPage=8&cdThread=Tx3ND88NVC53B3

Advertisements

26 thoughts on “Conversation about Christian Science on a Discussion Board

  1. “Wow!’, Karen! I love your comments and answers to questions. I often feel the the “religion of Christian Science” interferes with the “world view of Christian Science”. You are a very gifted thinker and writer. Love, LuAnne

    On Mon, May 11, 2015 at 9:07 AM, Adventures of the Madcap Christian Scientist wrote:

    > Karen Molenaar Terrell posted: “What prayer feels like, for me, is… > it’s like waking up to a beautiful sunrise in the morning or listening to > an inspiring piece of music, or looking at the stars on a clear night – > it’s a feeling of uplift – of thoughts soaring, of fear dissipating, of” Respond > to this post by replying above this line > New post on *Adventures of the Madcap Christian Scientist* > Conversation about > Christian Science on a Discussion Board > by > Karen Molenaar Terrell > > > *What prayer feels like, for me, is… it’s like waking up to a beautiful > sunrise in the morning or listening to an inspiring piece of music, or > looking at the stars on a clear night – it’s a feeling of uplift – of > thoughts soaring, of fear dissipating, of a consciousness full of joy and > good will. Often times my prayers come with humor – laughing always seems > to help get rid of fear for me – and for me, fear is always a part of > whatever problem I’m facing. And Love is always a part of the healing. I’ve > sometimes known I was healed before I saw the healing manifested humanly – > I could feel the change in my thoughts. * > – Karen Molenaar Terrell > > Every now and then something really amazing happens – people with > different perspectives on life will get beyond biases, prejudices, and > stereotypes and have a real conversation with each other! I love when that > happens… > > Here are excerpts from a recent conversation about Christian Science on an > Amazon Discussion Forum: > > > *Mustaaaaard says: Yeah. Christian Science. The people who let their > children die because they don’t believe in Tylenol. Eff off.* > > > *Karen says: I was raised by a CS mom (now 87) and a non-religious dad > (will be 97 in a month), and I could not have asked for better parents. My > parents maybe didn’t share the same religious beliefs, but they shared the > same values and taught their children to take care of the environment, to > appreciate the beauty of nature, to look for the good in people, to play > fair, to not be quick to judge others, to not buy into every piece of > hearsay, rumor, and gossip that comes our way, but to do our own research, > and question our own beliefs and biases, and recognize the biases of > others, too. I’m really grateful they are still in my life.* > > > *The Weasel asks: Karen, can the core beliefs of CS be boiled down to a > few bullet points? Can you try to list them as far as you understand them > to be please?* > > > *Karen says: Hi Weasel,* > > * It’s probably important to note that I am not an official spokesperson > for the CS church or anything – and I do not speak for any other CSists – > just for myself. CSists come in all shapes and sizes and colors and > political parties and most professions (I even knew a CSist who was a > dentist 🙂 ). There’s no one in our church leadership telling us how to > vote or who to vote for or where to stand on social-political issues – that > is left up to individual conscience. Some CSists are religious. Some are > not. I am not. In my mind I make a distinction between the religion of > Christian Science, and Christian Science as a way of living, and a way of > looking at the world. * > > * It might actually be easier to start with what CSists don’t believe:* > * – CSists don’t believe in an anthropomorphic god* > * – CSists don’t believe the world was literally created in a week* > * – CSists don’t believe in literal places of hell and heaven* > * – CSists don’t believe in pleading, cajoling, and begging a capricious > supernatural god who might choose to heal, or might choose to not heal his > children* > * – CSists don’t believe in Original Sin, or that God’s children are > sinners.* > > * What CSists believe:* > * – Mary Baker Eddy, the discover of CS, offers these synonyms for God: > Principle, Mind, Soul, Spirit, Life, Truth, and Love.* > * – CSists believe that Jesus’ mission here was to show us how to heal.

    • LuAnne, thank you so much for this response! I’m never sure how people are going to feel about my posts… it’s awfully nice to know someone actually took the time to read it, and liked it! 🙂 xoxoxo

  2. Great answers. It goes to show how individual Christian Science subjectivity can be for us. It’s a good approach to be subjective. Enough of the boiler plate answers.

    My approach is quite different but respectful in it own way. I deal a lot with scientific folks and atheists. So I tend to accentuate the Science of Christian Science with them. That angle is what they are usually interested in hearing but are surprised to hear. There is a preconception that anything religious, or spiritual, or so-called supernatural is entirely the opposite of scientific thinking.

    • Hi, Bill – Yes. I have found the best conversations are between people who have the courage to be genuine and sincere and honest with each other – between people who have a certain amount of trust with each other. And between people who aren’t easily offended, don’t take things personally, don’t get all indignant and self-righteous about stuff. We’re all just learning here – all classmates in “Earth’s Preparatory School” – and I think it’s helpful when we realize that. 🙂

  3. Thanks for being steadfast in your non-reactionary and loving responses, Karen … you are opening hearts. We always feel from you that your mission is not to propagate CS but to spread the message of acceptance of all paths and to be an example of the power of Love. Muchos appreciation to you dear friend ~

    • rhythmnrancher(s) – You write: “We always feel from you that your mission is not to propagate CS but to spread the message of acceptance of all paths and to be an example of the power of Love.” Thank you! I love you guys!

  4. That was wonderful!

    I would say, “Oh God, that was wonderful!” but I can hear the objecting voice of my 12 year old who takes not taking the Lord’s name in vain very seriously. 😉

  5. Pingback: Conversation about Christian Science on a Discussion Board: Every now and then something really amazing happens – people with different perspectives on life will get beyond biases, prejudices, and stereotypes and have a real conversation with each other

  6. Wonderful responses Karen! You are such a gifted writer and explain CS so well, with humor and LOVE :). I think Mrs. Eddy would be very pleased :). I always love your stories about your family. Bless you!!

  7. Pingback: Conversation about Christian Science on a Discussion Board | Adventures of the Madcap Christian Scientist

  8. Karen
    This is an interesting discussion and you presented your beliefs extremely well. I haven’t identified with any particular religion for a long time now because I believe Jesus was trying to teach us how to be one with God and only one, meaning each of us needs to seek a spiritual path that leads to love, peace and harmony regardless of how it looks to others. I don’t feel a need to attach a name to my faith other than one who follows the teachings of Jesus. How I get to my final destination is totally up to me but along the way I am expected to treat everybody I encounter with honesty and compassion. If my actions don’t align with my words then I will never be one with God and this is where far too many people lose their way. Religion becomes an insurance policy that they pay into in hopes of ending up in Heaven. They don’t really believe in God but just in case they’re wrong they want to hedge their bets. I’m willing to bet that my actions will speak louder and more clearly than any words I could ever choose and I’m not afraid to die trying. Thanks for the opportunity to share.

  9. Thank you so much for posting this. I appreciate the care and thoughtfulness of your answers.
    Often when confronted by someone who does not know what a CS is. Beyond some of your many points, I let them know we are “allowed” to use medical means for healing if we choose to do so and are not shunned or excommunicated if we do so.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: