(3rd Book) Introduction to The Madcap Christian Scientist: All Things New

(Introduction to The Madcap Christian Scientist: All Things New)

Vonnegut, Stevenson, and Adams Talking in My Head –

In the beginning, God created the earth, and he looked upon it in His cosmic loneliness. And God said, “Let Us make living creatures out of mud, so the mud can see what We have done.” And God created every living creature that now moveth, and one was man. Mud as man alone could speak. God leaned close as mud as man sat up, looked around, and spoke. Man blinked. “What is the purpose of all this?” he asked politely. “Everything must have a purpose?” asked God. “Certainly,” said man. “Then I leave it to you to think of one for all this,” said God. – Kurt Vonnegut

But our early man has a moment to reflect and he thinks to himself, “Well, this is an interesting world that I find myself in,” and then he asks himself a very treacherous question, a question that is totally meaningless and fallacious, but only comes about because of the nature of the sort of person he is, the sort of person he has evolved into, and the sort of person who has thrived because he thinks this particular way. Man the maker looks at his world and says, “So who made this, then?” Who made this? – you can see why it’s a treacherous question. Early man thinks , “Well, because there’s only one sort of being I know about who makes things, whoever made all this must therefore be a much bigger, much more powerful and necessarily invisible, one of me, and because I tend to be the strong one who does all the stuff, he’s probably male.” And so we have the idea of a God. Then, because when we make things, we do it with the intention of doing something with them, early man asks himself, “If he made it, what did he make it for?” – Douglas Adams

Beloved, let us love one another: for love is of God; and every one that loveth is born of God, and knoweth God. He that loveth not knoweth not God; for God is love… God is love; and he that dwelleth in love dwelleth in God, and God in him. I John 4

This year I’ve had the great good privilege of holding conversations with authors Douglas Adams (author of The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy series), Kurt Vonnegut (author of Slaughterhouse Five and other equally amazing novels), and D.E. Stevenson (author of the Miss Buncle books). Okay, so I didn’t, like, actually talk to any of them in the person – seeing as how they’re all dead and everything, but I did have the great joy of reading their books for the first time this year, and sort of… well… talking to them in my head.

We all laughed together at the nonsense of life and humankind and ourselves, we chatted about God, and I found kinship with them in our similar views of “Life, the Universe, and Everything” (another of Adams’s books).

Adams and Vonnegut were atheists (I didn’t find any place in her writings where Stevenson actually voices her thoughts regarding a belief in God) and, although I do believe in God, I, too, am an atheist when it comes to an anthropomorphic god who lives in the clouds and zaps his children to hell periodically. I am of the opinion that THAT kind of a god should have long ago gone the way of Zeus and Mars and ridden off into the sunset on his fiery chariot never to be seen again except in the study of ancient cultures and literature.

I wish I would have found Adams, Vonnegut, and Stevenson earlier in my life. I can’t believe it took me so long. I’m sad that I didn’t get to know Adams – who was only five years older than me – when he was walking the earth. I’m sad that his sudden death at the age of 49 didn’t have the significance to me that it would have, had I known him then. I wish I would have understood , then , what his early departure meant to the world . And when I read his last book, The Salmon of Doubt – compiled in the year after his death by his friends and editors – I found myself sobbing when I got to the end of it – knowing there wouldn’t be any more. I felt like I had lost a good friend.

Kurt Vonnegut introduced his readers to the fictitious but way cool religion of Bokononism in his book, Cat’s Cradle, and I will be making periodic references to Bokononism in my book.

And D.E. Stevenson introduced me to the wonderfully enlightened and wise Miss Buncle, who’s brought me laughter and the comforting feeling that I am not alone as I pretend to be a grown-up.

I’m going to bring my new friends into this book with me. They are a part of my life now, and they need to be a part of this book, too.

http://www.amazon.com/Madcap-Christian-Scientist-All-Things/dp/1499746164/ref=asap_B0044P90RQ_1_2?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1415835816&sr=1-2

Birthing another book – I didn’t even know I was pregnant!

Just published the third book in the Madcap Christian Scientist series. Yippy skippy! Yee haw! And stuff. I brought Douglas Adams (author of the Hitchiker’s Guide to the Galaxy series), Kurt Vonnegut (author of Slaughterhouse Five and other wonderful reads), and D.E. Stevenson (author of the Miss Buncle books) along with me in this book. I had to, really – I became acquainted with all of them just in the last year and they have become an important part of my life. (I know, right?! How could I have missed their gifts all these years?!) It was a pleasure working with all of them while I tapped out the latest Madcap. Of course, they’re all… well… dead… so I didn’t actually work with them in the person – but their humor and wit was with me during the process, and their quotes begin each chapter.

I didn’t actually know I was going to write another book until – much to my surprise! – I discovered myself writing it. “Whoah. I guess I’m writing a book!” I said to myself as it started taking form. “How the heck did THAT happen?!” I probably felt sort of – but not really – like those women who discover as they go into labor that they are pregnant. Who knew?!

And, like labor, birthing a book can be pretty intense. The focus narrows. Dinners burn. Calls go unanswered. Contractions come in odd hours of the night and one finds oneself ensconced in one’s office in front of one’s laptop tapping out words when one should be… like… sleeping.

As I was designing the new book cover, it came to me that I really should change the book covers of the previous two books to make them look like they’re all siblings in the same family. And THEN it came to me that… well, wouldn’t it be cool if I made a color wheel of them? Make the first one purple, the second one blue, the third one green… and so forth…? And THEN I thought… hey! I can use my own photos on the covers!!! So. Yeah. Here’s what I came up with…

Whatd’ya think?

Okay, I know that my hero Stephen Colbert suggests we should all boycott Amazon right now – and I understand his reasons for this, and I can’t say I disagree with them – but for authors like myself, boycotting Amazon kind of stinks. It’s like boycotting the midwife who helped birth my baby – or like refusing to look at photos of my new baby because you don’t happen to like the photographer who took them. Ahem. So I’m thinking that if you’re boycotting Amazon right now,  maybe you can make just a teensy weensy exception and… have I mentioned that my new book is now available on Amazon as both a printed book, and a Kindle book?

Print: http://www.amazon.com/Madcap-Christian-Scientist-All-Things/dp/1499746164/ref=la_B0044P90RQ_1_3_title_0_main?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1402095612&sr=1-3

Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/Madcap-Christian-Scientist-All-Things-ebook/dp/B00KQ29D0K/ref=la_B0044P90RQ_1_4_title_0_main?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1402095612&sr=1-4