“Why Do You Write?”

Why?

Because I’m a writer. That’s what writers do. Artists use brushes; I use a keyboard.

But what’s the point? Do you think you’re going to change anyone’s minds about stuff?

No, I know that’s not likely. And that’s not even my purpose. I don’t have a need for people to believe and feel and think exactly what I believe and feel and think about everything. People can believe whatever they want to believe, as long as their beliefs don’t cause harm to others.

You know why I share my thoughts and feelings in writing? Because I know there are other people out there who share similar feelings and I want them to know I understand what they’re feeling. I want them to know they’re not alone. I want to understand the perspectives of other people, too, and I want to give them the chance to understand mine – whether we agree with each other or not, I think it’s cool when we can understand each other.

Writing is how I connect to others. Writing – and reading what others have written – helps keep us from feeling isolated from one another.

That’s why.

Holding Eye Contact

Have your eyes ever held onto someone else’s
during labor, an earthquake, storm, tumult?
And, while conflict and terror rage around you,
you feel safe held in that eye contact –
you feel the calm, the courage, the strength
coming through the space between you.
You know, whatever happens, you’re not alone.

I want to be that for you.
Look here. Look at me. You’re not alone.
I’m with you in the storm.
-Karen Molenaar Terrell

***

Holding eye contact
with God – with Truth, Life, and Love –
focused on what’s true.
-Karen Molenaar Terrell

Sun Shining Through the Clouds. Photo by Karen Molenaar Terrell.




Grateful for Our Connection

Back in February and March – when COVID-19 was first making the news – I had terrible fears for a loved one who was traveling though Europe. (Maybe someday I’ll share more about that.) My terror caused me to pull out all the tools I’d acquired in my life to get me through troubling times – and one of the chief tools was expressing gratitude for all the good in my life.

I remember lying in bed one night in particular – my thoughts were all agitated and I couldn’t find peace. I was just staring at the ceiling, trying to calm myself, and I started listing in my thoughts all the people I was grateful for in my life – my sons, husband, Mom and Dad, siblings, nieces and nephews, in-laws, friends from grade school, junior high, high school, university, Mount Rainier friends, neighbors, colleagues, church friends, Humoristian friends, FB friends, WordPress friends – and then I found myself including people who might not be considered “friends” – people I thought had maybe treated me unkindly or unfairly, people I’d had a rift with – and I found myself genuinely grateful for THEM, too, and for my connection to them.

It was a cosmic moment for me. I felt my connection to all of God’s, Love’s, creation – and each and every expression of Life. I knew this overwhelming gratitude that I’m not solitary and alone in this vast, infinite universe – grateful for my connection to all the infinite expressions of Life. I felt Love’s presence with me – supporting me – sure and comforting and healing and powerful. My fears dissolved away and I was able to go back to sleep.

I’m going to practice having more of those cosmic moments.

And I know those moments begin with love.

Blue Cosmos (photo by Karen Molenaar Terrell)